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aliens now. there have been promises of a u.s. visit program, an entry exit system to track everyone entering into the country to make sure they exit in time. that was first promised back in 1986, ten years later, 1996, congress passed another act to require a fully integrated entry-exit system and full implementation by 2005. guess what, madam president, 2005 has come and gone, it's been 30 years since that initial promise was made. we still don't have an operational effective u.s. visit system. madam president, my colleague from alabama mentioned another glaring example, the fence, the secure fence act. in 2006 we actually passed it in legislation. the secure fence act of 2006 promised to achieve operational control of the entire border. operational control the entire border. and it defind operational control. quote, "the prevention of unlawful entries into the united states including entries by terrorists, unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, narcotics and other droon band" -- close quote. well, we clearly haven't achieved that. in fact, we're so far from that goal, d.h.s. h
fan. if the masters or u.s. open are on, i'm not going to interrupt her. she also loves football and that's appropriate because i've also learned that she is a master of the awbled. in 2008 i was heavily involved in an effort to bring volkswagen's u.s. production facility to chattanooga. just before one of the final meetings in tennessee, a planeful of decision-makers was stuck on the tarmac in germany without clear action to land in the u.s. some kind of paperwork issue. anybody who has been involved in a major recruitment effort knows that in something like this, even a small glitch can be a major setback. the volkswagen folks called me. i talked with ramona. i am not entitled sure what she did but i'm sure it was all legal and above board. at one point she was sitting there jockeying several phone calls on th on the switchboard d talking the plane off the runway in germany. the volkswagen executives landed in the u.s. highly impressed with ramona lessen. shortly thereafter, they chose chattanooga for her u.s. production facility. she was a home run no doubt. i think ramona's g
: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
american and u.s. air in the really raleigh market? >> we -- the overlap, i think is just on the washington, d.c., flight. american serves the hubs for raleigh we serve our hubs from there. i think the overlap is limited to the one flight. >> all right. and i noticed -- and the prices on american and u.s. airways are virtually the same flying out of raleigh occur ram to d.c. how much overlap do you have in charlotte. >> virtually zero. we have a very large connecting hub in charlotte. >> all right. i believe u.s. air serves d.c. out of charlotte, i think they are probably the carrier that has the most flights out of charlotte to d.c. what years years would you anticipate the price difference is from raleigh to d.c. and charlotte to d.c. is? >> i don't know. it sounds like you might know. [laughter] >> it costas lot more money to fly from charlotte to d.c. than raleigh to washington. that's concerning. it's very concerning. and you're direct competitors in a route from raleigh to washington where as u.s. airways it doesn't have a direct competitor, so it costs more money. that would certainl
that. of their inventions by the way are doing just fine. in fact in 2012, u.s. global data traffic reached 207 bytes per month. a 62% increase over the previous year to the growth in the context processing to wonder seven bytes per month is the equivalent of watching 52 million dvds per month or sending 570 million text messages each second over our wireless networks and mobile usage will only continue to surge well into the future. its estimate of the mobile data tracking will grown ninefold in the next five years. furthermore, wireless devices are proliferating at an unprecedented rate. 51 million new devices are connected to the mobile networks in the last year alone bringing the total of american mobile enabled devices to 424 million roughly. it is estimated that 775 million wirelessly connected devices will be used by americans by the year 2017. to relieve the congested networks there to move wireless data to the unlicensed systems. last year 96% of the u.s. traffic associated with the devices was carried on the wi-fi network's at some point. not only does this percentage incl
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
a european u.s. free trade agreement of some sort and also to complete the partnership because of the ability my experience in the country isn't willing to put their lives on the table this is the first administration since fdr not to ask for the authority to the decline of one and online to are you willing to ask us to get you and work with this ways and means committee so we can indeed make good on the president's commitment? >> senator, i tried to work to advance free and fair trade at times when it was extremely unpopular. i worked to make sure we didn't have protectionist policies in the late 1970's and the early 1980's. i worked in the clinton administration and the obama administration and i shaped it when i was at the state department. i think it was a great announcement president made with europe and by the look forward working with you and the members of the committee to have a free and fair trade that expands the market. >> would you be open to -- >> i would be open to the discussion that still has to take place on that. i would certainly engage on it. >> my last question is a writ
's number-one priority will be taking care of our troops. he is a veterans' advocate with the u.s.o. and he's won the respect and admiration of veterans' groups, in addition he's won the support of an extraordinary array of former secretaries of defense, ambassadors and diplomats, senior retired military leaders and in particular, two former members of this body who appeared with him at his testimony, former senators warren and nunn. i believe that chuck hagel is the right man for the challenges, the fiscal challenges that will confront the department of defense. put aside sequester, which i dearly hope will not happen, secretary panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will w
've heard recently that among developed nations the u.s. has fallen to the bottom as far as longevity is concerned. yet we're paying a lot more than other people. wouldn't it save substantial medicare costs if we veered away from the pill for every ill, that mindset that we've kind of adopted in this country and embrace, look at other measures such as prevention, alternatives and educating people on things like genetically-modified foods and the long-term dangers they can present? >> i don't know who wants to take this. this is, i mean, questions often come up about improving coverage of prevention sort of over the course of a lifetime and in medicare. um, and there's been a lot of in that, and there have been a lot of improvements lately. one of the sort of unfortunate realities of living in this town and working with the congressional budge office as a score -- budget office as a scorekeeper is sometimes those initiatives, people believe they will save money, the cbo scores an increase in spending depending on the preventive service because they don't have a lifetime view, or they m
points in the projected u.s. federal deficits over the remainder of this century. if mr. obama will not make his case, who will? the title of that budget -- that editorial -- "obama's budget shows failure of leadership." that is absolutely true, it was a failure of leadership. what about "the washington post" writing on a little further -- quote -- "white house budget director jacob j. lew has told advocates of reform that the white house thinks any significant plan offered by the president would simply become a target for a partisan attack." then he goes on to quote alice rivlin, saying -- quote -- "i would have preferred to see the administration get out front on addressing the entitlements and the tax reform that we need to reduce long-run deficits," said alice rivlin, a commission member on the deficit commission who served as budget director in the clinton white house. that's what alice rivlin, a wise commentator. a democrat but a wise commentator. but -- and she went on to say -- quote -- "but they clearly made a tactical decision." she meant a political decision. "the
of medical m.r.i.'s. if we're to compete successfully and keep quality jobs here in the u.s., we need to invest robustly both in a 21st century infrastructure as well as in a system of education and training that equips our young people and workers for the jobs of the future. so in this broader context, what is the best way to address the resulting deficits? do we just slash spending for education? slash spending for infrastructure. slash spending for research and discovery? sacrificing investments that we'll need to grow our economy in the decades ahead? do we just allow this destructive sequester to kick in, costing us jobs, cutting vital supports for middle-class americans. madam president, these are the destructive budget options that will take effect starting tomorrow if we fail to act. that's why i've come to the floor today at the 11th hour to plead one final time for compromise and common sense from republicans. yes, i'm here to plead for some common sense, some compromise from republican leadership. now there are plenty of areas where we can cut spending without seriously har
a central psychological or political space in the u.s., russian relationship. i don't think that's true where russia is. further on, that was on page one of the report. then it says this about bilateral and nuclear arms negotiations on page 16. >> would you forgive the interruption? i think i'm able to set a time for a vote now if we can get some idea about how long you want to speak him and i'm not trying to limit you. can you give us an idea about how long? i just talked to senator blumenthal and i want to ask senator hirono the same question. >> i just want to share a few thoughts spent know, is five minutes enough? >> seven. >> that's no problem. senatosenator hirono, how long t you speak? senator blumenthal? i'm now going to schedule a vote for 5:00. you about at five. we will hopefully have just about everybody there. if not, if somebody's on their way we can stay here until everybody has an opportunity either to vote in person or vote by proxy. senator sessions, so 5:00 we will start the vote. senator sessions, forgive the interruption. >> let me ask one question, mr. chair. ther
. their record -- lousy, persistent, double-digit unemployment and negative economic growth. the u.s. unemployment rate of 7.9% which is actually even higher than my home state is for sure too high, but it is far better than the rate of 26% unemployment in spain and greece, the record of 16% unemployment in portugal. our 2.3% growth rate may seem inadequate and it is, but as we recover from the deepest recession we've seen since the great depression, it is much better than the negative growth rates in the countries that took the austerity path. the results are clear -- the evidence is in from the austerity experiments. the countries that cut the deepest have hurt the most. if we want to continue growing our economy and creating jobs, we need to resist the european path that is championed by republican austerity advocates. we need to maintain the balanced approach that has brought the u.s. economy up out of recession. admittedly not fast enough, but look at what the alternative has been. leader reid's bill would replace the indiscriminate cuts of the so-called sequester with targeted
't want. >> i'm a student of the kennedy school. do you have any plans on expanding beyond u.s., for instance, to europe? [inaudible] hasn't been very successful expanding to many european countries. thank you. >> yeah. we're looking -- international coverage is really interesting. i think that we're trying every single print issue of the magazine at least a couple times a week to always have international content be in the mix. so we've had reported pieces from venezuela, or we had someone who was embedded in the afghanistan. we ran a piece in the last two issues ago on that. so it's really important. the question for us from just a business standpoint is, um, the economics of it. more often than not it works for us, it works best for us to work with freelance reporters or who are contributing for us and luke, who i just mentioned contributes for "the new york times" as well, and so we can get the content, we can get the ideas in the magazine we don't have, you know, a bureau in paris or kabul or something, something like that. so, but the international stuff, i think, is key
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15